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Easy Reading Intervention: Listening Passage Preview

 

Listening Passage Preview is a simple academic intervention that targets reading fluency. This intervention involves an accomplished reader reading a passage out loud while a struggling reader follows along silently. After a few minutes the roles are switched and the struggling reader reads out loud while the accomplished reader follows along silently and provides feedback when necessary.

Procedures for Listening Passage Preview:

  • 1. The accomplished reader (e.g., teacher, parent, tutor, older sibling) sits with the student in a calm environment free of major distractions.
  • 2. Position the book or text so that both readers can easily view the material. In some cases it may be easier to have two copies of the passage.
  • 3. Tell the struggling reader, “Now we are going to read together. Each time, I will read first, while you follow along silently in the book. Then you read the same part out loud.”
  • 4. The accomplished reader reads aloud for approximately 2 minutes while the student reads along silently. It may be helpful for the student if the accomplished reader tracks his/her location on the page with an index finger.
  • 5. Once time is up, stop reading and tell the student “Now it is your turn to read. If you come to a word that you do not know, I will help you with it.”
  • 6. If the student misreads a word or hesitates 5 seconds correct the error and have the student continue reading the passage.
  • 7. Repeat steps 3-6 until the passage is completed.
  • During the story you can emphasize reading comprehension by periodically asking the student comprehension questions (e.g., who, what, when, where, how, why). In addition, encourage the student to become engaged in the story. For example, a good comprehension question that involves the reader would be, “Who is your favorite character so far? Why?”

Before reading a passage in front of a group, allow the student to read it several times using the Listening Passage Preview intervention. This may help build the student’s reading fluency and confidence in his/her ability to read the passage.

Adapted from:

Rose, T. L., & Sherry, L. (1984). Relative effects of two previewing procedures on LD adolescents’ oral reading performance. Learning Disabilities Quarterly, 7, 39-44.

Swain, K.D., Leader-Jannsen, E.M, & Conley, P. (2013). Effects or repeated reading and listening passage preview on oral reading fluency. Reading Improvement, 50(1), 12-18.

Van Bon, W. H. J., Boksebeld, L. M., Font Freide, T. A. M., & Van den Hurk, J. M. (1991). A comparison of three methods of reading-while-listening. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 24, 471-476

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